Can Catholics Comprehend Cryptocurrency?

I’m typically a late adopter when it comes to technology.

Odd, since I’m a technologist and full-time software engineer.

But I was one of the last people in my set to get a smartphone or an Instagram account (which I don’t use).

But with cryptocurrency, I’ve decided to become an early adopter. This post is all about Bitcoin and blockchain and cryptocurrency, and how it relates to us as Catholics.

The Bitcoin

Bitcoin is a virtual currency, with a limited supply, secured and tracked through a peer-to-peer network of computers around the world. You can watch a video explaining more details here.

What makes it special is that no central organization controls it, yet by using cryptographic algorithms it is unhackable and also ensures that no one can double spend the same virtual bitcoin twice at the same time.

For Americans and others whose governments and currencies have been mostly stable, bitcoin sounds like a solution in search of a problem, but in countries with runaway hyper-inflation like Venezuela, Zimbabwe, and South Africa, bitcoin represents a store of value that is much less volatile and uncertain than their own national currencies.

Other Cryptocurrencies

Bitcoin and its associated technology, the blockchain, which is the public, immutable ledger of all the transactions that have ever taken place, has given rise to tens of thousands of other crytpocurrencies.

Many of these are forks of the bitcoin codebase, with a few of the parameters tweaked. Others are completely different systems that share only the idea of a decentralized, immutable ledger.

Ethereum is the second biggest cryptocurrency, and its claim to fame is the ability to write “smart contract” code that runs on the Ethereum network of computers. These smart contracts are programs that can enforce rules between two or more parties, allowing the exchange of digital goods, the minting of new kinds of cryptocurrency tokens, and the tracking of ownership of real world goods.

If you want to see a list of the top cryptocurrencies, their prices, market cap, and more, check out this site.

What Should a Catholic Think?

At first glance, bitcoin and other cryptos, being decentralized systems, would seem to be opposed by design against the Catholic Church as the most centralized organization in the world.

But in fact, this is not the case. The Catholic Church operates on the principle of subsidiarity, which means a problem should be addressed at the most local level possible. That might be person-to-person, or at the family level, the neighborhood, the community, the town, the parish, the diocese, or the global level (e.g. United Nations, the Pope, etc.).

Therefore, the Catholic Church can benefit from cryptocurrency technology without fearing any existential threat to itself. Catholics should be encouraged to make use of all the technology at their disposal to do good with it. Yes, technology can be used for evil, and of course it has been many times, but it can also be harnessed for good.

So Catholics have been getting into cryptocurrency, albeit at a relatively slow adoption pace. A few Catholics doing crypto are:

Brantly wrote an excellent introductory article about crypto for ChurchPOP a few years ago, yet the comments were anything but favorable:

One person opines this could be the anti-Christ’s world currency. (I’d say they’ve read a bit too many Protestant Left Behind series novels.)

Another commenter discounts Bitcoin as a fad peddled by traders and geeky-feeling people, which is valueless because no sovereign country guarantees it, and further claims the blockchain is hackable.

In brief response, whether it is a fad or not remains to be seen, but its demise has been predicted many times thus far, and each time it has resiliently bounced back.

Sovereign governments guarantee their fiat currencies, yet the market has revealed in many cases that their guarantee is worthless (see Venezuela for a recent example), so government backing is not in itself a sufficient requirement for trust. Finally, bitcoin has not been hacked, even though various exchanges have been due to incompetence or negligence.

Finally, someone accuses Bitcoin of being a scam and a ponzi scheme, and then proceeds to shame Brantly for writing the article.

A decentralized currency that no one owns or controls, whose transactions are fully auditable on a public ledger, which has a fixed supply and proven security through open-source code and cryptography, is an unlikely culprit as a ponzi scheme or scam, each of which always relies on central (bad) actors who control the money and technology.

No, it’s not a ponzi scheme, and it is irresponsible to claim that it is. But this type of ignorance is common with cryptocurrency commentators, and I personally excuse the person for spreading fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD). Indeed, FUD is a key aspect among the cryptocurrency movement, and if you engage in the movement you have to be prepared for it.

Where to Find Catholic Cryptocurrency People

What if you want to know more or chat with other Catholics about cryptocurrency?

Here’s a facebook group of Catholic Cryptocurrency people you can request to join.

You can also follow me on Steemit, which is a facebook-like social network for cryptocurrency that is itself fueled by cryptocurrency.

I provide a paid consulting service for people wanting to get into crypto or who need help with some aspect of it. It is a complex world and one goof can cost you a lot of money, so oftentimes you need some guidance from a trusted source.

But How Can It Help the Church?

Cryptocurrency can be used in the service of the Church in many ways. Brantly wrote two years ago about a sacramental registry system. Many other ideas exist, and I have no doubt that we will see some enterprising projects started in the near future that will bring blockchain technology to the Catholic Church.

Got a question or a comment? Leave it below and let’s chat!

Pray Catholic Novena App–1 Year later

A year ago my friend Chad and I published Pray: the Catholic Novena App to the Apple app store.

Honestly, we didn’t know what to expect. Would Catholics find this app helpful in their prayer life?

I knew it helped me to remember to pray novenas and to not forget which day I was on, but would other Catholics find it similarly useful?

One Year, And Countless Novenas Later

Well, the verdict came in: Catholics loved the app. We were inundated with (mostly) five-star reviews, novena requests, and emails of thanks. We saw prayer warriors from Tanzania to England, the Philippines to Japan, Australia to Sweden and many countries in between.

We listened to what users wanted and implemented their requests in the app.

Along the way, I was touched by the heartfelt emails that people sent to me through the app–yes they all go right into my email–with requests for prayers on everything from cancer to depression, to finding their future spouse to conceiving children.

I could relate to most of these requests–I had prayed novenas for the very same hopes!–and so a community was born based around this ancient devotional practice within Christ’s Church.

Novenas Answered

During my single years, while seeking God’s vocation for my life, I prayed numerous novenas to St. Joseph for wisdom in discernment and then for the grace to meet my future wife.

It was through such prayers that I met my wife Catherine.

We hoped for children right away, but months passed and no children were conceived. So we prayed more novenas, and we conceived. We had such joy, but two months later we miscarried, the first first of three children we lost to miscarriage.

We turned again to God through novenas and conceived, and our son Edmund was born.

Again and again our Lord has been faithful to us through the prayers of the saints. Through the novenas, we have grown closer to these great saints as well, learning more about them, feeling a kinship with them in the communion of saints.

Androids Were Left Out

The only problem was: the Pray app was serving roughly half of Catholics: it was only on Apple devices like iPhones and iPads, not on Android ones. And given that many inexpensive Android devices are accessible and used by Catholics in developing countries and around the world, we needed to port the app to Android.

Technically speaking, this is a difficult task. It required a rewrite of the app using a different programming language on a completely different platform.

We did a crowdfunding campaign through IndieGogo and raised $1,300. Normally, that would not pay for even one-tenth of the price of a mobile app, but because Chad and I are programmers and have ties to the software development community, we were able to find a mutually beneficial situation with a up-and-coming Android developer. He was willing to write the app for almost the exact amount we had raised!

The result: we are now live in the Google Play store with the Pray app!

Novena Avalanche

I’ve been amazed at how many Catholics are now praying novenas with the app. Before the app, I prayed perhaps two novenas per year. In the past year, I prayed 19 novenas! The app made it that easy.

What’s also been amazing is how generous our patrons have been. Originally in the app, there was no way to pay for it (app was free) and no way to donate to our mission of spreading novena prayers around the world.

You could unlock novenas by sharing them with a friend. But people emailed me explaining they had already invited all their friends, or didn’t have many friends, so could they please just donate or pay us?

We listened and added in a patronage model. You could become a patron for $4.99 per year or $9.99 per year. You get the same benefits no matter which level you choose to become a patron at. The surprising result: half the patrons chose the higher level of patronage!

This was a big validation to us that our mission and execution of it in the app was helpful. People wanted us to continue work on the app, and so we have. By their generosity we have been able to add more features, more novenas, bring it to Android, and have many other plans for it.

Going on Right Now, Huge Novena

As this goes to publication, not only is the app now on Android, but also we’ve added the amazing Divine Mercy Novena to the app.

This novena and the Chaplet that goes with it has been a favorite of mine ever since I learned of it shortly after becoming Catholic. The Marians kindly gave me permission to add the novena to the app, for which I am grateful.

The app is becoming the #1 Catholic app in the world. Join us and begin to grow closer to God in prayer!